Vitamin A

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is an important for ocular and immune system health. However, it is a fat soluble vitamin. That means overconsumption is possible, resulting in toxicity that is highly dangerous and difficult to treat. Prevention is the best way to avoid complications from consuming too much Vitamin A. So people should always be careful and mindful about how much one is intaking through dietary and supplemental sources.

Vitamin B1

Vitamin B1

Vitamin B1 is necessary for optimal cell function. This vitamin is also commonly referred to as Thiamine. Its primary role lies in facilitating energy metabolism from consumed nourishment. Thiamine can be found in pork and whole grains along with nuts and seeds.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is essential for wellness. It is an antioxidant that helps protect individuals from bodily harm on a cellular level resulting from free radicals that everyone inevitably comes into contact with. In addition, vitamin C’s has multiple beneficial impacts on the immune system that are widely known and even subject of much speculative mythology.

Vitamin B3

Niacin (Vitamin B3)

Vitamin B3 plays an important role in energy metabolism. Also referred to as Niacin. Like many other B vitamins, the primary role of Niacin is in relation to energy metabolism from consumed foods. This vitamin also plays a role in regulating the nervous system, digestive tract, and in skin health. It can be found in many food sources like meat, breads, leafy green vegetables, and peanut butter.

Biotin

Biotin

Biotin contains the building blocks of an enzyme important for energy metabolism. This vitamin also assists in supporting skin health and a regulated nervous system. Some anecdotal evidence suggests that regulating taking Biotin supplements may strengthen an individual's nails, making them less brittle and susceptible to damage.

Folic Acid

Folic Acid

Folic acid is a component of an enzyme central to cellular processes of DNA synthesis, new cell growth and reproduction especially in terms of red blood cells. For these reasons, childbearing and nursing mothers or those who plan to do so in the future should be sure to maintain adequate levels through their usual dietary intake to ensure the newborn’s optimal health from the start. Deficiencies in folic acid at an early age can detrimentally affect central nervous system development in newborns.

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 also assists in energy metabolism, helping in the conversion of carbs, protein, and fat molecules into usable energy for somatic cell processes. Like folic acid, Vitamin B6 - also referred to as pyridoxine - is an important building block for proper red blood cell formation. But unlike Vitamin A, Vitamin B6 is water soluble, which means that toxicity due to overconsumption is unlikely to occur or cause major health issues.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 helps regulate the metabolic processes that convert consumed nourishment into usable forms of energy for body cells. This vitamin is important especially for the digestion of protein and fat molecules. In addition, vitamin B12 also helps regulate one’s nervous system like many other B vitamins. Vitamin B12 is generally found in meat or animal derived products. Thus vegetarians are at risk for deficient intake and should be sure to supplement their diet with additional sources compatible with their lifestyle decisions.